After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to overhaul US disaster policy – here's how

NOAA released its list of climate and weather disasters that cost the nation more than $1 billion each. Like many climate and weather events this past year, it shattered the record.

Deb Niemeier, Clark Distinguished Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland • conversation
Jan. 8, 2021 ~11 min

climate-change policy construction floods hurricanes storms global-warming natural-disasters wildfires government disaster-risk fema building disaster-management land-use building-codes 2020

After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to make US disaster policy more effective and equitable – here's how

NOAA released its list of climate and weather disasters that cost the nation more than $1 billion each. Like many climate and weather events this past year, it shattered the record.

Deb Niemeier, Clark Distinguished Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland • conversation
Jan. 8, 2021 ~11 min

policy construction floods hurricanes storms natural-disasters wildfires government disaster-risk fema building disaster-management land-use building-codes 2020

Overshadowed by COVID: the deadly extreme weather of 2020

Many storms, heatwaves, fires and droughts slipped under the radar this year.

Wilson Chan, PhD Researcher in Drought Risk, University of Reading • conversation
Dec. 30, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change flooding hurricanes storms drought extreme-weather wildfires heatwave cyclones

The Marshall Islands could be wiped out by climate change – and their colonial history limits their ability to save themselves

Climate change is a true existential threat for small island nations, but the US has done little to help the Marshall Islands, which it administered for decades.

Caroline E. Ferguson, PhD candidate in Environment and Resources, Stanford University • conversation
Dec. 11, 2020 ~10 min

climate-change climate sea-level-rise flooding colonialism storm-surge climate-change-adaptation nuclear-weapons pacific-ocean marshall-islands forced-migration small-island-states

Scientists at work: Sloshing through marshes to see how birds survive hurricanes

Birds found along the Gulf Coast have evolved to ride out hurricanes and tropical storms. But with development degrading the marshes where they live, it's getting harder for them to bounce back.

Mark Woodrey, Assistant Research Professor, Mississippi State University • conversation
Oct. 28, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change birds ecology mississippi sea-level-rise hurricanes scientists-at-work tropical-storms coastal-development marshes wetlands gulf-coast alabama

Extreme weather: October downpour sees UK's wettest day on record

Persistent rain on Saturday 3 October breaks the record for the wettest day across the entire UK.

bbcnews
Oct. 16, 2020 ~3 min

climate-change severe-weather loch-ness met-office storm-ciara

An autoimmune-like antibody response is linked with severe COVID-19

Patients suffering from severe COVID-19 may be experiencing a rogue antibody response similar to that seen in autoimmune diseases. The findings offer new approaches for COVID-19 therapy.

Matthew Woodruff, Instructor, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University • conversation
Oct. 8, 2020 ~8 min

 covid-19  immune-system  pandemic  sars-cov-2  viruses  infection  cytokine-storm  antibody  autoimmune-diseases  b-cell

3D model seeks to explain mysterious hexagon storm on Saturn

Harvard researchers use a 3D model to figure out how a hexagon-shaped mega-storm on Saturn was formed.

Juan Siliezar • harvard
Oct. 5, 2020 ~8 min

science-technology faculty-of-arts-and-sciences juan-siliezar saturn department-of-earth-and-planetary-sciences hexagon-storm jeremy-bloxham rakesh-k-yadav

Gaps between night and day heat drives severe storms

Larger differences between the Earth's surface temperature at night and day increase the risk of severe thunderstorms and flood-causing cloud bursts.

Ida Eriksen-U. Copenhagen • futurity
Sept. 29, 2020 ~6 min

floods storms rain weather earth-and-environment

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names – and then two more storms formed

It's only happened twice since naming started in 1950, and there's an unusual twist to where many of the storms are forming this year.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~6 min

climate-change hurricanes storms el-nino meteorology natural-disasters oceans atlantic-ocean la-nina tropical-cyclones enso

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