Meatpacking plants have been deadly COVID-19 hot spots – but policies that encourage workers to show up sick are legal

Thousands of workers at meat- and poultry-processing plants have contracted COVID-19, and hundreds have died. A legal scholar recommends ways to make their jobs safer.

Ruqaiijah Yearby, Professor of Law, Saint Louis University • conversation
Feb. 26, 2021 ~9 min

To make the US auto fleet greener, increasing fuel efficiency matters more than selling electric vehicles

Electric cars get a lot of hype, but EV sales today are actually increasing transportation's carbon footprint. Here's how federal clean-car standards produce this counterintuitive result.

John DeCicco, Research Professor Emeritus, University of Michigan • conversation
Jan. 28, 2021 ~9 min

Biden has pledged to advance environmental justice – here's how the EPA can start

The US environmental justice movement dates back to the early 1980s, but federal support for it has been weak and inconsistent. Here are four things Biden's EPA can do to improve that record.

David Konisky, Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University • conversation
Jan. 25, 2021 ~8 min

Poor US pandemic response will reverberate in health care politics for years, health scholars warn

Health policy and politics scholars expect political fallout from the federal response to the pandemic will play out for years, with trust in government taking a big hit.

Sarah E. Gollust, Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota • conversation
Nov. 3, 2020 ~8 min

Monarch butterflies' spectacular migration is at risk – an ambitious new plan aims to help save it

Can a plan that brings together government and private landowners create enough habitat for monarch butterflies?

D. André Green II, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~9 min

Looser standards for showerheads could send a lot of water and money down the drain

The Trump administration is trying to roll back a regulation that requires showerheads to conserve water and saves owners an average of $70 and nearly 3,000 gallons of water yearly per showerhead.

Robert Glennon, Regents Professor and Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy, University of Arizona • conversation
Sept. 2, 2020 ~8 min

Trump greenlights drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but will oil companies show up?

The Trump administration is opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas leasing – a step that's as much about politics as it is about energy.

Scott L. Montgomery, Lecturer, Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington • conversation
Aug. 21, 2020 ~9 min

Conservation could create jobs post-pandemic

The Trump administration is rolling back environmental regulations, claiming it's good for the economy. But research shows that conservation is better both for public health and for job creation.

Heidi Peltier, Research Professor in Political Science; Faculty Research Fellow at the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, Boston University • conversation
June 18, 2020 ~6 min

Cuba's clean rivers show the benefits of reducing nutrient pollution

Cuba's sustainable approach to farming has protected its rivers from the kind of nutrient pollution that impairs many US waterways.

Amanda H. Schmidt, Associate Professor of Geology, Oberlin College and Conservatory • conversation
June 10, 2020 ~9 min

EPA decides to reject the latest science, endanger public health and ignore the law by keeping an outdated fine particle air pollution standard

After a 5-year review, the EPA is leaving US standards for fine particle air pollution unchanged, even though recent studies suggest that tightening them could save thousands of lives yearly.

H. Christopher Frey, Glenn E. Futrell Distinguished University Professor of Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University • conversation
May 1, 2020 ~9 min

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