The US isn't in a second wave of coronavirus – the first wave never ended

The recent spike in new coronavirus cases in the US is not due to a second wave, but simply the virus moving into new populations or surging in places that opened up too soon.

Melissa Hawkins, Professor of Public Health, Director of Public Health Scholars Program, American University • conversation
June 30, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic transmission sars-cov-2 new-york 1918-flu-pandemic florida texas second-wave eradication

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.

Eva Kassens-Noor, Associate Professor, Urban & Regional Planning Program and Global Urban Studies Program, Michigan State University • conversation
June 19, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: influenza covid-19 coronavirus history pandemic vaccines flu quarantine sars-cov-2 1918-flu-pandemic h1n1-influenza us-history swine-flu-pandemic

What the archaeological record reveals about epidemics throughout history – and the human response to them

People have lived with infectious disease throughout the millennia, with culture and biology influencing each other. Archaeologists decode the stories told by bones and what accompanies them.

Michael Westaway, Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Archaeology, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland • conversation
June 15, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: infectious-diseases covid-19 coronavirus archaeology pandemic skeletons plague sars-cov-2 outbreak disease pathology 1918-flu-pandemic black-death pathogens disease-spread pathogen skeleton bioarchaeology

Compare the flu pandemic of 1918 and COVID-19 with caution – the past is not a prediction

Differences in the viruses' biology and societal contexts mean there's no guarantee today's pandemic will mirror the 'waves' of infection a century ago.

Megan Culler Freeman, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellow, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
June 4, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: influenza history-of-medicine covid-19 pandemic sars-cov-2 1918-flu-pandemic h1n1-influenza virology second-wave

When restaurants close, Americans lose much more than a meal

Restaurants have always been about more than feeding city residents. During the 1918 flu pandemic, they were kept open as sites of social solidarity.

Rebecca L. Spang, Professor of History and Director, Liberal Arts and Management Program (LAMP), Indiana University • conversation
March 20, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  coronavirus  history  food  coronavirus-2020  france  restaurants  public  1918-flu-pandemic

10 misconceptions about the 1918 flu, the 'greatest pandemic in history'

The so-called 'Spanish flu' didn't actually come from Spain. What else do people often misunderstand about this famous crisis?

Richard Gunderman, Chancellor's Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, Indiana University • conversation
March 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  influenza  covid-19  coronavirus  history  pandemic  flu  coronavirus-2020  spanish-flu  1918-flu-pandemic  world-war-i

Page 1 of 1