Did a volcanic eruption in Alaska help end the Roman republic?

New research suggests ancient climate change shaped the fate of western civilisation.

Guy Middleton, Visiting Fellow, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University • conversation
June 22, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change archaeology roman-empire ancient-history ice-cores global-cooling julius-caesar ancient-rome roman-republic

Did a volcanic eruption in Alaska end the Roman republic?

New research suggests ancient climate change shaped the fate of western civilisation.

Guy Middleton, Visiting Fellow, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University • conversation
June 22, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change archaeology roman-empire ancient-history ice-cores global-cooling julius-caesar ancient-rome roman-republic

What the archaeological record reveals about epidemics throughout history – and the human response to them

People have lived with infectious disease throughout the millennia, with culture and biology influencing each other. Archaeologists decode the stories told by bones and what accompanies them.

Michael Westaway, Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Archaeology, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland • conversation
June 15, 2020 ~11 min

infectious-diseases covid-19 coronavirus archaeology pandemic skeletons plague sars-cov-2 outbreak disease pathology 1918-flu-pandemic black-death pathogens disease-spread pathogen skeleton bioarchaeology

Titanic salvage: recovering the ship's radio could signal a disaster for underwater cultural heritage

A recent ruling allowing a new expedition to the Titanic wreck gives the go ahead to commercial exploitation.

Fraser Sturt, Professor of Archaeology, University of Southampton • conversation
June 9, 2020 ~7 min

archaeology maritime-archaeology titanic shipwrecks

Prehistoric human footprints reveal a rare snapshot of ancient human group behavior

The footprints of over 20 different prehistoric people, pressed into volcanic ash thousands of years ago in Tanzania, show possible evidence for sexual division of labor in this ancient community.

Briana Pobiner, Research Scientist and Museum Educator, Smithsonian Institution • conversation
May 14, 2020 ~8 min

anthropology human-evolution archaeology paleontology human-behavior behavior tanzania paleoanthropology hominins prehistory

Rewilding: lessons from the medieval Baltic crusades

The Baltic crusades had a long term impact on the local environment – 700 years later, the details of this are clear.

Rowena Banerjea, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, University of Reading • conversation
May 11, 2020 ~8 min

environment biodiversity history archaeology interdisciplinarity rewilding medieval-history deep-time

Archaeologists have a lot of dates wrong for North American indigenous history – but we're using new techniques to get it right

Modern dating techniques are providing new time frames for indigenous settlements in Northeast North America, free from the Eurocentric bias that previously led to incorrect assumptions.

Sturt Manning, Director of the Cornell Tree Ring Laboratory and Professor of Classical Archaeology, Cornell University • conversation
April 29, 2020 ~9 min

archaeology new-york ontario radiocarbon-dating indigenous-history colonialist colonial-america colonial-history european-settlement beads

Humans domesticated horses – new tech could help archaeologists figure out where and when

Archaeologists have long argued over when and how people first domesticated horses. A decade ago, new techniques appeared to have provided answers – but further discoveries change the story again.

William Taylor, Assistant Professor and Curator of Archaeology, University of Colorado Boulder • conversation
March 2, 2020 ~10 min

 ancient-dna  archaeology  teeth  domestication  mongolia  horses  kazakhstan  adna  zooarchaeology

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