Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos evolved to drink blood

Finches have evolved to feed off blood from red-footed and Nazca boobies – and we've seen it first-hand.

Jaime Chaves, Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolution, San Francisco State University • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

evolution birds natural-selection mutualism darwins-finches parasitism galapagos

Cities can help migrating birds on their way by planting more trees and turning lights off at night

Cities are danger zones for migrating birds, but there are ways to help feathered visitors pass through more safely

Frank La Sorte, Research Associate, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Cornell University • conversation
yesterday ~9 min

birds migration trees citizen-science parks migratory-birds sustainable-cities light-pollution pavement urban-trees ebird

Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos got a taste for big bird blood

Finches have evolved to feed off blood from red-footed and Nazca boobies – and we've seen it first-hand.

Jaime Chaves, Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolution, San Francisco State University • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

evolution birds natural-selection mutualism darwins-finches parasitism galapagos

What to feed ducks – according to science

Your local ducks (and other wild birds) will thank you.

Sara Burt, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Public Health, Utrecht University • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~6 min

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From permafrost microbes to survivor songbirds – research projects are also victims of COVID-19 pandemic

Three scientists describe the fieldwork they've had to delay in 2020 because of the pandemic. These are setbacks not just for their careers, but for the body of scientific knowledge.

Miriah Kelly, Assistant Professor of Environment, Geography & Marine Sciences, Southern Connecticut State University • conversation
Dec. 7, 2020 ~10 min

climate-change covid-19 birds pandemic permafrost microbiology research scientific-research scientists covid-19-pandemic field-research fieldwork svalbard songbirds united-nations-framework-convention-on-climate-change

Flightless birds were more common before human-driven extinctions – new study

Evolution towards flightlessness has been much more common through history than scientists once thought.

Tim Blackburn, Professor of Invasion Biology , UCL • conversation
Dec. 2, 2020 ~6 min

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How do geese know how to fly south for the winter?

Geese honk loudly and point their bills toward the sky when they're ready to start the migration. Here's how they know it's time, how they navigate and how they conserve energy on the grueling trip.

Tom Langen, Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
Nov. 16, 2020 ~8 min

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Scientists at work: Sloshing through marshes to see how birds survive hurricanes

Birds found along the Gulf Coast have evolved to ride out hurricanes and tropical storms. But with development degrading the marshes where they live, it's getting harder for them to bounce back.

Mark Woodrey, Assistant Research Professor, Mississippi State University • conversation
Oct. 28, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change birds ecology mississippi sea-level-rise hurricanes scientists-at-work tropical-storms coastal-development marshes wetlands gulf-coast alabama

Giant 'toothed' birds flew over Antarctica 40 million to 50 million years ago

Paleontologists have discovered fossil remains belonging to an enormous 'toothed' bird that lived for a period of about 60 million years after dinosaurs.

Peter A. Kloess, Doctoral Candidate, Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Oct. 27, 2020 ~7 min

 birds  asteroid  dinosaurs  extinction  fish  fossils  reptiles  jaws  specimens  ice-age  antarctica  ice  new-zealand  ducks  earth  snow  museums  penguins  squid  marsupials  skeleton  southern-ocean  continents  cretaceous-period  natural-history  1980s  pterosaurs  vultures  southern-hemisphere  albatross  university-of-california-berkeley

Curious Kids: How did some animals evolve wings to fly?

Today's birds evolved from feathered dinosaurs.

Matthew Wills, Professor of Evolutionary Palaeobiology at the Milner Centre for Evolution, University of Bath • conversation
Oct. 22, 2020 ~5 min

evolution birds dinosaurs feathered-dinosaurs curious-kids

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