Homes are flooding outside FEMA's 100-year flood zones, and racial inequality is showing through

New risk models show nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the government's flood maps indicate.

Kevin T. Smiley, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Louisiana State University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: cities poverty flooding hurricanes natural-disasters fema urban floodplains hurricane-harvey

In changing urban neighborhoods, new food offerings can set the table for gentrification

Hip food offerings can signal that a neighborhood is gentrifying – especially when they repackage traditional foods for wealthy white eaters.

Yuki Kato, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Georgetown University • conversation
July 10, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: cities protest supermarkets food restaurants diversity farmers-markets economic-development community-gardens gentrification displacement foodies cafes

Street vendors make cities livelier, safer and fairer – here's why they belong on the post-COVID-19 urban scene

After trying to remove street vendors from its cities for years, China is supporting them to help jump-start its economy. An urban scholar explains why other cities should do the same.

John Rennie Short, Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • conversation
July 8, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: cities covid-19 china immigrants informal-economy jobs new-york-city urban-policy farmers-markets postpandemic-future markets

Coronavirus deaths in San Francisco vs. New York: What causes such big differences in cities' tolls?

Why one city suffers significantly more deaths than another isn't always obvious. A simple experiment shows how failing to consider certain factors can point policy makers in the wrong direction.

Brian W. Whitcomb, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
June 2, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: health cities covid-19 coronavirus politics policy statistics data population modeling health-policy

Is your neighborhood raising your coronavirus risk? Redlining decades ago set communities up for greater danger

Neighborhood characteristics like pollution from busy roads, widespread public transit use and lack of community-based health care are putting certain communities at greater risk from COVID-19.

Sarah Rowan, Assistant Professor of Medicine-Infectious Disease, University of Colorado Denver • conversation
May 26, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: health public-health cities covid-19 coronavirus pollution transport insurance population discrimination commuting urban community

Parks matter more than ever during a time of sickness – something Frederick Law Olmsted understood in the 19th century

Frederick Law Olmsted, the designer of many great North American city parks, understood that ready access to nature made cities healthier places to live.

Richard leBrasseur, Assisant Professor of Landscape Architecture and Director, Green Infrastructure Performance Lab, Dalhousie University • conversation
May 18, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: public-health cities covid-19 social-distancing coronavirus-2020 urban-life parks city-parks landscape-architecture sustainable-cities

Coronavirus: what the lockdown could mean for urban wildlife

With wild boar in Barcelona and coyotes in San Francisco, the lockdown has transformed concrete jungles worldwide.

Becky Thomas, Senior Teaching Fellow in Ecology, Royal Holloway • conversation
April 3, 2020 ~5 min

Tags:  cities  coronavirus  birds  nature  lockdown  hedgehogs  urban-wildlife  urban-ecology

Coronavirus: how the lockdown could affect urban wildlife

With wild boar in Barcelona and coyotes in San Francisco, the lockdown has transformed concrete jungles worldwide.

Becky Thomas, Senior Teaching Fellow in Ecology, Royal Holloway • conversation
April 3, 2020 ~5 min

Tags:  cities  coronavirus  birds  nature  lockdown  hedgehogs  urban-wildlife  urban-ecology

Is your city making you fat? How urban planning can address the obesity epidemic

Four out of 5 Americans live in cities, so urban planning can make a big difference in our lifestyles – especially if it promotes healthy diets and physical activity.

John Rennie Short, Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • conversation
Feb. 20, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  cities  obesity  exercise  walking  urban-planning  bicycling  urban-policy  parks  food-deserts  city-parks

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