Some bees are born curious while others are more single-minded – new research hints at how the hive picks which flowers to feast on

New research suggests individual bees are born with one of two learning styles – either curious or focused. Their genetic tendency has implications for how the hive works together.

Chelsea Cook, Assistant Professor in Biology, Marquette University • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: genetics insects bees biology food colonies communication group-dynamics drones queen-bees information curiosity foraging nectar

How to hide from a drone – the subtle art of 'ghosting' in the age of surveillance

Avoiding drones' prying eyes can be as complicated as donning a high-tech hoodie and as simple as ducking under a tree.

Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Political Sociology, University of San Diego • conversation
July 28, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: facial-recognition demonstrations surveillance gps drones infrared mit-press civil-liberties mass-surveillance surveillance-systems us-protests face-surveillance

With the help of trained dolphins, our team of researchers is building a specialized drone to help us study dolphins in the wild

Wild dolphins are fast, smart and hard to study, but it is important to understand how human actions affect their health. So we are building a drone to sample hormones from the blowholes of dolphins.

Jason Bruck, Teaching Assistant Professor of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University • conversation
July 1, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: robots hormones marine-biology drones whales bermuda dolphins dolphin stress-hormones marine-mammals innovation-and-invention

Coronavirus: medical drones could soon be helping to beat the crisis

The usefulness of drones to the medical sector has been clear for several years – and well-funded start-ups have been trialling services around the world.

Olivier Usher, Lead, Research and Impact, Nesta • conversation
May 1, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: innovation covid-19 coronavirus drones medical-supplies

Robots are playing many roles in the coronavirus crisis – and offering lessons for future disasters

Robots are helping health care workers and public safety officials more safely and quickly treat coronavirus patients and contain the pandemic. They have something in common: They're tried and tested.

Vignesh Babu Manjunath Gandudi, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Texas A&M University • conversation
April 22, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: robotics covid-19 coronavirus robots automation pandemic quarantine disaster public-safety hospitals healthcare new-coronavirus drones disinfection

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