Now's the time to rethink your relationship with nature

If all of humanity was wiped out tomorrow, it's estimated that the natural world would take at least five million years to recover from the damage humans have done to the world.

Matthew Adams, Principal Lecturer in Psychology, University of Brighton • conversation
yesterday ~6 min

environment pandemic nature anthropocene interdisciplinarity climate-crisis earth humans interdisciplinary-research environmental-damage interdisciplinary-thinking

Biden plans to fight climate change in a way no U.S. president has done before

Former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter explains how the new administration can mobilize all parts of his government as it faces five big climate challenges.

Bill Ritter Jr., Director, Center for the New Energy Economy, Colorado State University • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~9 min

climate-change energy environment electricity electric-vehicles joe-biden regulations colorado clean-energy climate-policy john-kerry biden-administration

Wildfire smoke changes dramatically as it ages, and that matters for downwind air quality – here's what we learned flying through smoke plumes

Thousands of chemical compounds in wildfire smoke are interacting with each other and sunlight as the smoke travels. For people downwind, it can become more toxic over time.

Brett B. Palm, Postdoctoral Researcher in Atmospheric Chemistry, University of Washington • conversation
Dec. 17, 2020 ~8 min

chemistry health environment science air-pollution particulates atmospheric-science wildfires smoke environmental-health pm-25 flight firefighting smoke-inhalation

Connecting to nature is good for kids – but they may need help coping with a planet in peril

Here are four ways adults can help kids work through their worries about the environment.

Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita of Environmental Design, University of Colorado Boulder • conversation
Nov. 16, 2020 ~6 min

children climate-change environment anxiety wellbeing nature parenting parks adolescents youth-activism outdoor-play

Most plastic recycling produces low-value materials – but we've found a way to turn a common plastic into high-value molecules

Plastic waste is a global problem. Now a chemist has developed a new strategy for breaking down the most common plastic so it can be not just recycled, but upcycled into desirable goods.

Susannah Scott, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, University of California Santa Barbara • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~6 min

environment pollution recycling plastic plastic-recycling plastic-waste innovation-and-invention plastic-bags

Exposure to man-made chemicals influences genes controlling aging, immune system and metabolism

Man-made chemical disrupt the activities of most human genes. What effect does this have on human health and how should regulators respond?

Alexander Suvorov, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Oct. 15, 2020 ~8 min

health environment metabolism obesity immune-system genes toxicology

A radical nature-based agenda would help society overcome the psychological effects of coronavirus

Why structured contact with nature, rolled out with government support, will go a long way to solving the psychological distress of coronavirus.

Matthew Adams, Principal Lecturer in Psychology, University of Brighton • conversation
Oct. 9, 2020 ~8 min

environment mental-health covid-19 nature isolation interdisciplinarity climate-crisis green-prescriptions

California wildfires pass 4 million acres burned, doubling previous record – that's a lot of toxic smoke

To understand the risks of wildfire smoke, it helps to understand the chemicals people are breathing.

Joshua S. Fu, John D. Tickle Professor of Engineering and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee • conversation
Oct. 2, 2020 ~8 min

health environment pollution wildfire chemicals air-pollution natural-disasters wildfires smoke

Evolution on the smallest of scales smooths out the patchwork patterns of where plants and animals live

Local adaptation allows plants and animals to thrive in a diversity of places. Sometimes adaptation sharpens patterns of where organisms live, but 85% of the time, it creates a more homogeneous world.

Mark C. Urban, Director, Center of Biological Risk; Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut • conversation
Oct. 2, 2020 ~10 min

evolution environment ecology trees forests charles-darwin adaptation

Wildfire smoke is laced with toxic chemicals – here's how they got there

To understand the risks of wildfire smoke, it helps to understand the chemicals people are breathing.

Joshua S. Fu, John D. Tickle Professor of Engineering and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee • conversation
Oct. 2, 2020 ~8 min

health environment pollution wildfire chemicals air-pollution natural-disasters wildfires smoke

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