Why the EU's global fishing activities can't be called sustainable yet

Agreements between the EU and its partner countries for fishing rights could be a great vehicle to push sustainability but more must be done before we can say they are doing that.

Ingrid Kelling, Assistant Professor of Seafood Sustainability and Ethics, Heriot-Watt University • conversation
Jan. 21, 2021 ~9 min

Thousands of ocean fishing boats could be using forced labor – we used AI and satellite data to find them

Forced labor is a widespread problem in fisheries on the high seas. Between 2012 and 2018, an estimated 100,000 people may have been victims of forced labor on thousands of different boats.

Gavin McDonald, Senior Project Researcher, University of California Santa Barbara • conversation
Dec. 21, 2020 ~8 min

200 years ago, people discovered Antarctica – and promptly began profiting by slaughtering some of its animals to near extinction

For 200 years, a small number of countries have exploited the marine wildlife of Antarctica, often with devastating impact on their populations.

Alessandro Antonello, Senior Research Fellow in History, Flinders University • conversation
Nov. 13, 2020 ~8 min

Expanding marine protected areas by 5% could boost fish yields by 20% – but there's a catch

Most existing MPAs are in distant and largely empty waters. Expanding them where it counts will meet a lot of resistance.

Rick Stafford, Professor of Marine Biology and Conservation, Bournemouth University • conversation
Oct. 27, 2020 ~7 min

Restoring seagrasses can bring coastal bays back to life

Healthy seagrasses form underwater meadows teeming with fish and shellfish. A successful large-scale restoration project in Virginia could become a model for reseeding damaged seagrass beds worldwide.

Karen McGlathery, Professor of Environmental Sciences and Director, Environmental Resilience Institute, University of Virginia • conversation
Oct. 20, 2020 ~11 min

When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature

Thousands of dams across the US are aging and overdue for maintenance. Taking them down can revive rivers, restore fish runs and create new opportunities for tourism and outdoor activities.

Jon Honea, Assistant Professor of Science, Emerson College • conversation
May 29, 2020 ~9 min

Coastal fish populations didn't crash after the Deepwater Horizon spill – why not?

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill caused widespread damage in the Gulf of Mexico, but some parts of this complex ecosystem fared better than others.

F. Joel Fodrie, Associate Professor of Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
April 16, 2020 ~9 min

Scientists have found oil from the Deepwater Horizon blowout in fishes' livers and on the deep ocean floor

The Deepwater Horizon oil disaster catalyzed a decade of research on oil contamination in the Gulf of Mexico, from surface waters to the seabed, with surprising findings.

Sherryl Gilbert, Assistant Director, C-IMAGE Consortium, University of South Florida • conversation
April 13, 2020 ~10 min

Tagging data show that blue sharks are true globalists

You won't see a blue shark near the beach, but thanks to 50 years of tagging data, scientists are learning about their wide-ranging lives at sea.

Jasmin Graham, Ph.D. Candidate in Marine Science, Florida State University • conversation
March 24, 2020 ~5 min

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