How does being bilingual affect your brain? It depends on how you use language

Why the benefits of bilingualism aren't consistent.

Vincent DeLuca, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham • conversation
Oct. 6, 2020 ~6 min

brain neuroscience language bilingualism

GPT-3: new AI can write like a human but don't mistake that for thinking – neuroscientist

Elon Musk's OpenAI has developed software that can produce human-like writing. Don't mistake that for true intelligence.

Guillaume Thierry, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Bangor University • conversation
Sept. 17, 2020 ~6 min

neuroscience artificial-intelligence language writing

AI called GPT-3 can write like a human but don't mistake that for thinking – neuroscientist

Elon Musk's OpenAI has developed software that can produce human-like writing. Don't mistake that for true intelligence.

Guillaume Thierry, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Bangor University • conversation
Sept. 17, 2020 ~6 min

neuroscience artificial-intelligence language writing

AI called GPT-3 can now write like a human without thinking like one

Elon Musk's OpenAI has developed software that can produce human-like writing. Don't mistake that for true intelligence.

Guillaume Thierry, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Bangor University • conversation
Sept. 17, 2020 ~6 min

neuroscience artificial-intelligence language writing

The key to language is universal psychology, not universal grammar

Research on how children learn show we develop language skills by recycling other parts of our minds.

Paul Ibbotson, Lecturer in Developmental Psychology, The Open University • conversation
Aug. 21, 2020 ~7 min

language psychology noam-chomsky

Why do kids call their parents 'Mom' and 'Dad'?

One anthropologist found 1,072 similar words for 'mom' and 'dad' in the world's languages. It turns out a mix of biology, culture and encouragement from parents explains this phenomenon.

Denise Bodman, Principal Lecturer in Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University • conversation
May 6, 2020 ~6 min

children linguistics language parents mothers curious-kids curious-kids-us fathers dad names words baby-talk dads

Coronavirus jargon buster

Do you know your antigen from your endemic?

Lindsay Broadbent, Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University Belfast • conversation
April 3, 2020 ~7 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  language

Coronavirus jargon buster – how to sound like an expert

Do you know your antigen from your endemic?

Lindsay Broadbent, Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University Belfast • conversation
April 3, 2020 ~7 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  language

Forensic linguists explore how emojis can be used as evidence in court

Forensic linguists are called as expert witnesses in court cases to provide linguistic analysis of legal documents and other forms of oral and documentary evidence -- including emojis.

Russell H. Kaschula, Professor of African Language Studies, Rhodes University • conversation
March 22, 2020 ~7 min

 language  emoticons  emojis  forensic-linguistics

Why people take offence

It's all about context.

Tahmineh Tayebi, Lecturer, Aston Institute for Forensic Linguistics, Aston University • conversation
March 4, 2020 ~6 min

 linguistics  language  offensive-language  insults

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