How does the Johnson & Johnson vaccine compare to other coronavirus vaccines? 4 questions answered

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is different from the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines in a few important ways that could make it a huge help to global vaccination efforts.

Maureen Ferran, Associate Professor of Biology, Rochester Institute of Technology • conversation
Feb. 25, 2021 ~7 min

6 important truths about COVID-19 vaccines

With the vaccines now being administered at sites around the US, it is important to address misinformation surrounding the effort.

Kanneboyina Nagaraju, Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binghamton University, State University of New York • conversation
Feb. 18, 2021 ~10 min

Why it takes 2 shots to make mRNA vaccines do their antibody-creating best – and what the data shows on delaying the booster dose

With slow vaccine distribution and manufacturing, some people won't get the second dose on time. But does it matter?

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Jan. 28, 2021 ~6 min

Delaying second COVID-19 vaccine doses will make supplies last longer but comes with risks

With vaccine shortages looming, experts are debating whether it is important to receive two doses or whether it's better to give one dose to more people and give a second when the supply is better.

Sanjay Mishra, Project Coordinator & Staff Scientist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University • conversation
Jan. 11, 2021 ~11 min

How many people need to get a COVID-19 vaccine in order to stop the coronavirus?

Researchers say around 70% of the US needs to get the coronavirus vaccine to stop the pandemic. But questions around the vaccines and regional differences add some uncertainty to that estimate.

Pedro Mendes, Professor of Cell Biology, University of Connecticut • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~8 min

The cold supply chain can't reach everywhere – that's a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use need to be kept frozen. But there are many places in the world that can't support a cold supply chain.

Charles M. Schweik, Professor of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Jan. 4, 2021 ~7 min

Should pregnant women get the COVID-19 vaccine? Will it protect against asymptomatic infections and mutated viruses? An immunologist answers 3 questions

With vaccines forthcoming for most Americans, many groups, including expectant mothers, are wondering if the vaccine is safe for them and their babies. A physician-scientist explains.

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~6 min

What vaccine distribution planners can learn from Amazon and Walmart

COVID-19 vaccines have very specific storage requirements that make shipping a difficult task. Two ideas – fulfillment centers and cross-docking – could help overcome some distribution challenges.

Christopher S. Tang, Distinguished Professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration., University of California, Los Angeles • conversation
Dec. 15, 2020 ~7 min

Why paying people to get the coronavirus vaccine won't work

Millions of Americans say they won't get the vaccine. Will money change their minds? And is luring them with cash the right approach?

Robert Gatter, Professor of Law, Saint Louis University • conversation
Dec. 11, 2020 ~10 min

Vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 will have side effects – that's a good thing

The side effects of new SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are a result of immune system activation. While uncomfortable, they are both normal and expected. They are a sign that the vaccine is working.

Matthew Woodruff, Instructor, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University • conversation
Dec. 3, 2020 ~9 min

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