A few heavy storms cause a big chunk of nitrogen pollution from Midwest farms

New research shows that one-third of yearly nitrogen runoff from Midwest farms to the Gulf of Mexico occurs during a few heavy rainstorms. New fertilizing schedules could reduce nitrogen pollution.

Chaoqun Lu, Assistant Professor of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change agriculture rainfall nitrogen gulf-of-mexico us-midwest nutrient-pollution corn fertilizer sustainable-agriculture dead-zones fertilizer-runoff heavy-rainfall mississippi-river

Cuba's clean rivers show the benefits of reducing nutrient pollution

Cuba's sustainable approach to farming has protected its rivers from the kind of nutrient pollution that impairs many US waterways.

Amanda H. Schmidt, Associate Professor of Geology, Oberlin College and Conservatory • conversation
June 10, 2020 ~9 min

agriculture united-states rivers trump-administration cuba nutrient-pollution science-diplomacy agroecology obama-administration

Climate change threatens drinking water quality across the Great Lakes

Warmer waters, heavier storms and nutrient pollution are a triple threat to Great Lakes cities' drinking water. The solution: Cutting nutrient releases and installing systems to filter runoff.

Joseph D. Ortiz, Professor and Assistant Chair of Geology, Kent State University • conversation
April 29, 2020 ~11 min

climate-change ohio water-pollution infrastructure drinking-water great-lakes algae nutrient-pollution stormwater clean-water-act toxic-algae indiana green-roofs

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