How do mRNA vaccines work – and why do you need a second dose? 5 essential reads

So far, most vaccines in the US are mRNA vaccines. These represent a new technology and are likely to take over the vaccine world. But how do they work? What are their weaknesses? Five experts explain.

Daniel Merino, Assistant Editor: Science, Health, Environment; Co-Host: The Conversation Weekly Podcast • conversation
March 16, 2021 ~6 min

3 medical innovations fueled by COVID-19 that will outlast the pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has driven a lot of scientific progress in the past year. But just as some of the social changes are likely here to stay, so are some medical innovations.

Nevan Krogan, Professor and Director of Quantitative Biosciences Institute & Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco • conversation
March 9, 2021 ~12 min

How does the Johnson & Johnson vaccine compare to other coronavirus vaccines? 4 questions answered

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is different from the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines in a few important ways that could make it a huge help to global vaccination efforts.

Maureen Ferran, Associate Professor of Biology, Rochester Institute of Technology • conversation
Feb. 25, 2021 ~7 min

6 important truths about COVID-19 vaccines

With the vaccines now being administered at sites around the US, it is important to address misinformation surrounding the effort.

Kanneboyina Nagaraju, Professor of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binghamton University, State University of New York • conversation
Feb. 18, 2021 ~10 min

Will the COVID-19 vaccine work as well in patients with obesity?

Americans with excess weight and obesity have been hit hard by COVID-19. Now there is reason to believe they may not get the same protection from the vaccines.

Cate Varney, Clinical Physician, University of Virginia • conversation
Feb. 8, 2021 ~7 min

Why it takes 2 shots to make mRNA vaccines do their antibody-creating best – and what the data shows on delaying the booster dose

With slow vaccine distribution and manufacturing, some people won't get the second dose on time. But does it matter?

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Jan. 28, 2021 ~6 min

How many people need to get a COVID-19 vaccine in order to stop the coronavirus?

Researchers say around 70% of the US needs to get the coronavirus vaccine to stop the pandemic. But questions around the vaccines and regional differences add some uncertainty to that estimate.

Pedro Mendes, Professor of Cell Biology, University of Connecticut • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~8 min

The cold supply chain can't reach everywhere – that's a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use need to be kept frozen. But there are many places in the world that can't support a cold supply chain.

Charles M. Schweik, Professor of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Jan. 4, 2021 ~7 min

Why it matters that the coronavirus is changing – and what this means for vaccine effectiveness

A new strain of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 appears to be spreading fast in the the UK. What does this mean for vaccine developers and vaccinations?

David Kennedy, Assistant Professor of Biology, Penn State • conversation
Dec. 22, 2020 ~6 min

What vaccine distribution planners can learn from Amazon and Walmart

COVID-19 vaccines have very specific storage requirements that make shipping a difficult task. Two ideas – fulfillment centers and cross-docking – could help overcome some distribution challenges.

Christopher S. Tang, Distinguished Professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration., University of California, Los Angeles • conversation
Dec. 15, 2020 ~7 min

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