Curved origami offers a creative route to making robots and other mechanical devices

Curved origami isn't just elegant art. It's also a versatile way to vary the amount of force applied by robots and other machines.

Zirui Zhai, Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State University • conversation
Nov. 18, 2020 ~5 min

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Racial discrimination ages Black Americans faster, according to a 25-year-long study of families

A study of 800 Black American families shows early experiences of racism have long-term consequences for physical and mental health.

Sierra Carter, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgia State University • conversation
Nov. 17, 2020 ~5 min

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When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public's trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.

Stylianos Syropoulos, PhD Student in Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~6 min

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Conservatives value personal stories more than liberals do when evaluating scientific evidence

How much weight would you put on a scientist's expertise versus the opinion of a random stranger? People on either end of the political spectrum decide differently what seems true.

Michelle Sarraf, Master's Student in Economics, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona • conversation
Nov. 9, 2020 ~6 min

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The pitfalls of hospitals seeking donations from their rich patients

A survey suggests that most Americans feel that discussions about charitable support may interfere with the relationship between doctors and their patients.

Reshma Jagsi, Deputy Chair of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~4 min

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To save threatened plants and animals, restore habitat on farms, ranches and other working lands

The Earth is losing plants and animals at rates not seen in millions of years. Ecologists explain how protecting habitat on working lands – farms, forests and ranches – can help conserve species.

Sandra Díaz, Professor of Community and Ecosystem Ecology, Universidad de Córdoba (Argentina) • conversation
Oct. 29, 2020 ~6 min

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Want to teach kids about nature? Insects can help

Insects are plentiful and inexpensive. Even when children aren't attending school in person, they can learn from the encounters they have with insects outside.

Megan Ennes, Assistant Curator of Museum Education, University of Florida • conversation
Oct. 29, 2020 ~5 min

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A tiny circular racetrack for light can rapidly detect single molecules

An optical sensor that can detect individual molecules promises early detection of diseases and environmental contamination.

Judith Su, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Optical Sciences, University of Arizona • conversation
Oct. 22, 2020 ~5 min

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Neuronlike circuits bring brainlike computers a step closer

Artificial brains are far in the future, but computer chips that work like brains could keep computers advancing when today's silicon transistor chips reach their limit.

R. Stanley Williams, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~5 min

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Women equal men in computing skill, but are less confident

The gender gap in computing performance has dramatically narrowed, but a confidence gap remains.

William Wagner, Associate Professor of Accountancy & Information Systems, Villanova University • conversation
Sept. 28, 2020 ~4 min

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