National parks – even Mount Rushmore – show that there's more than one kind of patriotism

President Trump is scheduled to appear at an Independence Day celebration at Mount Rushmore on July 3. For some, this event will symbolize love of country. Others will see it very differently.

Jennifer Ladino, Professor of English, University of Idaho • conversation
June 29, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: covid-19 donald-trump japanese-internment-camps california us-history national-parks patriotism reconciliation independence-day july-4 south-dakota

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.

Eva Kassens-Noor, Associate Professor, Urban & Regional Planning Program and Global Urban Studies Program, Michigan State University • conversation
June 19, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: influenza covid-19 coronavirus history pandemic vaccines flu quarantine sars-cov-2 1918-flu-pandemic h1n1-influenza us-history swine-flu-pandemic

Can Asia end its uncontrolled consumption of wildlife? Here's how North America did it a century ago

In the 1800s, Americans hunted many wild species near or into extinction. Then in the early 1900s, the US shifted from uncontrolled consumption of wildlife to conservation. Could Asia follow suit?

Roland Kays, Research Associate Professor of Wildlife and Scientist at NC Museum of Natural Sciences, North Carolina State University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: covid-19 china wildlife fishing wildlife-conservation bison endangered-species us-history wildlife-trade asia hunting ivory-ban wildlife-management

Gold rush, mercury legacy: Small-scale mining for gold has produced long-lasting toxic pollution, from 1860s California to modern Peru

Small-scale gold mining operations in developing countries are major sources of toxic mercury pollution, using techniques that haven't changed much since the California Gold Rush 150 years ago.

Jasmine Parham, Ph.D. Student in Biology, Duke University • conversation
May 28, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: amazon air-pollution mercury mining mine-tailings california us-history gold metals peru toxic-waste minamata-convention

The first Earth Day was a shot heard around the world

April 22, 2020 is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, which catalyzed action to protect the environment not just in the US but internationally.

Maria Ivanova, Associate Professor of Global Governance and Director, Center for Governance and Sustainability, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston • conversation
April 16, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: conservation earth-day united-nations us-history us-foreign-policy richard-nixon us-diplomacy international-affairs united-nations-environment-programme-unep

What 'Walden' can tell us about social distancing and focusing on life's essentials

'Walden,' published in 1854, is a manual for solitude with a purpose.

Robert M. Thorson, Professor of Geology, University of Connecticut • conversation
March 26, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  covid-19  social-distancing  literature  books  environmentalism  materialism  us-history  massachusetts  solitude  henry-david-thoreau

Coronavirus: Three lessons from the AIDS crisis

It took decades for scientists to recognize HIV/AIDS as a new disease, and years longer to mobilize an effective response with broad public support. Will the US do better against novel coronavirus?

Laurie Marhoefer, Associate Professor of History, University of Washington • conversation
March 16, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  infectious-diseases  public-health  covid-19  coronavirus  hivaids  epidemics  us-history

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