Could employers and states mandate COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what the courts have ruled

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus policy law vaccines measles government supreme-court courts smallpox mandates

Mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what states and employers can legally require

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus policy law vaccines measles government supreme-court courts smallpox mandates

Video: An infectious disease expert explains the results from Moderna's latest vaccine trials

The results from the phase 1 trial are a promising first step in showing that the mRNA vaccine is a viable candidate, but there are unanswered questions and it is still early in the process.

Sanjay Mishra, Project Coordinator & Staff Scientist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University • conversation
July 17, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  biotechnology  covid-19  coronavirus  vaccines  covid-19-vaccine  moderna

An infectious disease expert explains the results from Moderna's latest vaccine trials

The results from the phase 1 trial are a promising first step in showing that the mRNA vaccine is a viable candidate, but there are unanswered questions and it is still early in the process.

Sanjay Mishra, Project Coordinator & Staff Scientist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University • conversation
July 17, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  biotechnology  covid-19  coronavirus  vaccines  covid-19-vaccine  moderna

How effective does a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic? A new study has answers

A vaccine that's 70% effective might not be good enough if too few people are willing to be vaccinated, new research shows.

Bruce Y. Lee, Professor of Health Policy and Management, City University of New York • conversation
July 15, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic vaccines social-distancing modeling mathematical-models

How 'good' does a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic? A new study has answers

A vaccine that's 70% effective might not be good enough if too few people are willing to be vaccinated, new research shows.

Bruce Y. Lee, Professor of Health Policy and Management, City University of New York • conversation
July 15, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic vaccines social-distancing modeling mathematical-models

Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans – including the one that causes COVID-19

Nanoparticles dressed up in cell membranes snag SARS-CoV-2 virus particles before they reach human cells.

Liangfang Zhang, Professor of Nanoengineering, University of California San Diego • conversation
July 9, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus immune-system nanotechnology pandemic vaccines treatment covid-19-vaccine biomedical-research covid-19-therapy

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.

Eva Kassens-Noor, Associate Professor, Urban & Regional Planning Program and Global Urban Studies Program, Michigan State University • conversation
June 19, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: influenza covid-19 coronavirus history pandemic vaccines flu quarantine sars-cov-2 1918-flu-pandemic h1n1-influenza us-history swine-flu-pandemic

I study coronavirus in a highly secured biosafety lab – here's why I feel safer here than in the world outside

To find a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, scientists need to work hands-on with the highly infectious coronavirus. It happens in a super secure lab designed to keep them safe and prevent any escapes.

Troy Sutton, Assistant Professor of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic vaccines sars-cov-2 scientific-research pathogens vaccine-research security biosecurity

How 'vaccine nationalism' could block vulnerable populations' access to COVID-19 vaccines

Should the US be able to pre-order vaccines for its citizens when other populations around the globe are at greater risk?

Ana Santos Rutschman, Assistant Professor of Law, Saint Louis University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: public-health covid-19 coronavirus vaccines sars-cov-2 united-nations human-rights nationalism international-law gavi

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