A man was reinfected with coronavirus after recovery – what does this mean for immunity?

Reports describe a Hong Kong man who was reinfected with the coronavirus after returning from Europe. Does that mean he wasn't immune after the first infection?

Megan Culler Freeman, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellow, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
Aug. 25, 2020 ~5 min

Tags:  covid-19  coronavirus  pandemic  common-cold  antibodies  sars-cov-2  immunity  viruses  infection  t-cell  hong-kong

Approval of a coronavirus vaccine would be just the beginning – huge production challenges could cause long delays

Once a coronavirus vaccine is approved, billions of doses need to be manufactured. Current vaccine production is nowhere near ready, for a variety of reasons, but planning now could help.

Bruce Y. Lee, Professor of Health Policy and Management, City University of New York • conversation
Aug. 24, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus manufacturing vaccines sars-cov-2 immunity herd-immunity viruses flu-vaccine pharma

Challenge trials for a coronavirus vaccine are unethical – except for in one unlikely scenario

Challenge trials – purposefully exposing volunteers to the coronavirus – could speed up the development of a vaccine. But there are serious ethical concerns with this approach.

Ben Bramble, Visiting Fellow, Princeton University • conversation
Aug. 24, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus ethics risk pandemic philosophy vaccines sars-cov-2 viruses lockdown bioethics essential-workers

I'm a lung doctor testing the blood plasma from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century-old idea that could be a fast track to treatment

In the blood of COVID-19 survivors are antibodies that can defeat SARS-CoV-2. Researchers are testing whether these antibodies can be collected and injected into others to save them from the virus.

Jeffrey M. Sturek, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Aug. 21, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  covid-19  pandemic  antibodies  sars-cov-2  viruses  infections  covid-19-therapy  convalescent-plasma

I'm a lung doctor testing the blood from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century old idea that could be a fast track to treatment

In the blood of COVID-19 survivors are antibodies that can defeat SARS-CoV-2. Researchers are testing whether these antibodies can be collected and injected into others to save them from the virus.

Jeffrey M. Sturek, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Aug. 21, 2020 ~7 min

Tags:  covid-19  pandemic  antibodies  sars-cov-2  viruses  infections  covid-19-therapy  convalescent-plasma

9 reasons you can be optimistic that a vaccine for COVID-19 will be widely available in 2021

As grim as things are with the pandemic raging in the US and the mounting death toll, there are many reasons to be optimistic there will be a vaccine by early next year.

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
Aug. 20, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  health  medicine  covid-19  coronavirus  pandemic  vaccines  antibodies  sars-cov-2  viruses  ace2  monoclonal-antibodies  spike-protein

A potential new weapon in the fight against COVID-19: Food coloring

Aerosols of some FDA-approved food coloring could deactivate airborne viruses.

Yuhyun Ji, Doctoral student in Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University • conversation
Aug. 20, 2020 ~4 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic fda sars-cov-2 viruses infection aerosols disinfection disinfectant pathogen airborne-transmission virus-transmission

Cloth masks do protect the wearer – breathing in less coronavirus means you get less sick

In places where everyone wears a mask, cases of COVID-19 seem to be less severe. Evidence from labs and outbreaks suggests that masks protect not only others, but the person wearing the mask, too.

Monica Gandhi, Professor of Medicine, Division of HIV, Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, University of California, San Francisco • conversation
Aug. 19, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus pandemic transmission sars-cov-2 n95-masks outbreak exposure viruses masks protection surgical-mask

The COVID-19 virus can spread through the air – here's what it'll take to detect the airborne particles

Miniaturized laboratory equipment is making it easier to identify airborne pathogens in the field, but there's still work ahead to be able to instantly determine if a room is safe or contaminated.

Shantanu Sur, Associate Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
Aug. 14, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: dna covid-19 coronavirus pandemic rna sars-cov-2 viruses pathogens star-trek airborne-virus metagenomics next-generation-sequencing pcr

Rapid screening tests that prioritize speed over accuracy could be key to ending the coronavirus pandemic

Testing large numbers of people regularly would reduce the spread of the coronavirus in the US. Laboratory testing is slow and expensive, but rapid screening tests could be the answer.

Zoë McLaren, Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • conversation
Aug. 14, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus fda sars-cov-2 food-and-drug-administration testing viruses false-positive rt-pcr swab-test false-negative diagnostic-test

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