Architect designs a playground for social development

With “High Sees,” architect Megan Panzano reasserts how play can impact mental and social development.

Travis Dagenais | Dec. 20, 2019 | harvard
~10 mins   

Tags: science-technology architecture basic-research children harvard-graduate-school-of-design high-sees megan-panzano mental-development social-development

Close to half of U.S. population projected to have obesity by 2030

Researchers predict a marked rise in American adults with obesity or severe obesity in 10 years, leaving several states with obesity prevalence close to 60 percent.

Nicole Rura | Dec. 18, 2019 | harvard
~3 mins   

Tags: health-medicine basic-research bmi harvard-th-chan-school-of-public-health obesity

Uncovering the switch that controls brain state

A team of researchers led by two Harvard alumni uncover a switch that controls brain states.

Juan Siliezar | Dec. 18, 2019 | harvard
~8 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research drew-robson faculty-of-arts-and-sciences harvard-fas jennifer-li max-planck-institute-for-biological-cybernetics neuroscience rowland-institute science zebrafish

Early detection of Alzheimer’s possible through algorithm

Researchers have developed a software-based method of scanning electronic health records to estimate the risk that a healthy person will receive a dementia diagnosis in the future.

Harvard Gazette | Dec. 17, 2019 | harvard
~4 mins   

Tags: health-medicine alzheimers-disease basic-research cognitive-symptoms dementia-diagnosis electronic-health-records natural-language-processing

Psychologist explains how to improve the holiday blues

Natalie Dattilo discusses how the holiday season can trigger the blues — and how to help avoid them.

Colleen Walsh | Dec. 16, 2019 | harvard
~8 mins   

Tags: health-medicine basic-research brigham-and-womens-hospital holidays mental-health natalie-dattilo

Papers that use positive words in headlines likelier to be cited

Analysis of more than 6 million clinical and life-science papers shows articles with male lead authors are up to 21 percent more likely than those with female lead authors to use language that frames their research positively, which could contribute to persistent gender gaps in pay and career advancement in life sciences and medicine.

Jake Miller | Dec. 16, 2019 | harvard
~8 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research blavatnik-institute-at-harvard-medical-school gender-differences inequality positive

Home hospital model reduces costs by 38%, improves care, study says

The first randomized controlled trial of the home hospital model in the U.S. reports improvements in health care outcomes while reducing costs by 38 percent.

Haley Bridger | Dec. 16, 2019 | harvard
~5 mins   

Tags: health-medicine basic-research brigham-and-womens-hospital health-care-costs home-hospital-model

High rate of antibiotic use in low-income countries ‘alarming’

A new study has found that between 2007 and 2017, children in eight low- and middle-income countries received, on average, 25 antibiotic prescriptions from birth through age 5 — up to five times higher than the already high levels observed in high-income settings.

Harvard Gazette | Dec. 16, 2019 | harvard
~5 mins   

Tags: health-medicine antibiotic-abuse antibiotic-prescriptions basic-research harvard-th-chan-school-of-public-health lancet-infectious-diseases low-income-countries management-of-fevers-group

Fewer Americans getting primary care is raising concerns

A national analysis revealed an alarming decline in primary care use, which is associated with better health outcomes than episodic, inconsistent care. The decline was most pronounced among younger Americans and those without complex medical conditions.

Jake Miller | Dec. 16, 2019 | harvard
~3 mins   

Tags: health-medicine basic-research beth-israel-deaconess-medical-center brigham-and-womens-hospital bruce-landon david-levine harvard-medical-school jake-miller primary-care

A probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease

A genetically programmed living hydrogel material that facilitates intestinal wound healing is being considered for development as a probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Benjamin Boettner | Dec. 6, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research crohns-disease e-wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering-at-harvard e-coli-nissle-strain ibd inflammatory-bowel-disease mucosal-healing probiotic probiotic-therapy ulcerative-colitis

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