A probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease

A genetically programmed living hydrogel material that facilitates intestinal wound healing is being considered for development as a probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Benjamin Boettner | Dec. 6, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research crohns-disease e-wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering-at-harvard e-coli-nissle-strain ibd inflammatory-bowel-disease mucosal-healing probiotic probiotic-therapy ulcerative-colitis

New laser hits mark on cancer imaging to airport security

Harvard researchers have developed a totally new type of laser that can reach terahertz frequencies offering short-range, high-bandwidth wireless communications, very-high-resolution radar, and spectroscopy.

Leah Burrows | Nov. 15, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology electromagnetic-spectrum engineering federico-capasso laser physics terahertz-frequencies tunable-terahertz-laser

New drug-detecting tool could help save lives

The landscape of the illegal drug trade changes constantly, particularly amid the current opioid crisis. Law-enforcement officers regularly find or confiscate pills, powders, and other substances and need to know their composition as quickly as possible to determine legal charges and sometimes to issue lifesaving warnings. Carfentanil is a case in point. This cousin to […]

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | Nov. 13, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: health-medicine basic-research caitlin-mcdermott-murphy cambridge carfentanil chemistry christoffer-abrahamsson dea drug-analysis drug-enforcement-administration engineering-technology fas fentanyl forensic-science george-whitesides law-enforcement opioid-epidemic

Better delivery system for sending chemo to cancerous lung tissue

A new technique called ELeCt (erythrocyte-leveraged chemotherapy) can transport drug-loaded nanoparticles into cancerous lung tissue by mounting them on the body’s own red blood cells.

Lindsay Brownell | Nov. 13, 2019 | harvard
~8 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research biodegradable-polymer cancer chemotherapy elect engineering erythrocyte-leveraged-chemotherapy john-a-paulson-school-of-engineering-and-applied-sciences lung-cancer trojan-horse wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering


First flight of RoboBee powered by soft muscles

Researchers have developed a resilient RoboBee powered by soft artificial muscles that can crash into walls, fall onto the floor, and collide with other RoboBees without being damaged.

Leah Burrows | Nov. 4, 2019 | harvard
~5 mins   

Tags: science-technology harvard-john-a-paulson-school-of-engineering-and-applied-science harvard-microrobotics-laboratory robobee soft-actuator

New blood test could be used to help millions infected with TB

A team of researchers has developed a point-of-care TB test that costs only $2 and gives results in about 30 minutes, lowering the barrier to care in low-resource settings and potentially saving millions of lives.

Lindsay Brownell | Oct. 23, 2019 | harvard
~9 mins   

Tags: health-medicine active-tuberculosis atb brigham-and-womens-hospital broad-institute-of-harvard-and-mit tb tb-triage-test wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering

Lab-grown meat gains muscle as it moves from petri dish to dinner plate

Researchers are able to build muscle fibers, giving lab-grown meat the texture meat lovers seek.

Leah Burrows | Oct. 21, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology harvard-john-a-paulson-school-of-engineering-and-applied-sciences kit-parker lab-grown-meat muscle-tissues wyss-institute

HubWeek panel explores ethics in the digital world

A HubWeek panel exploring ethics in the digital world featured computer scientist and entrepreneur Rana el Kaliouby and Harvard Professor Danielle Allen.

Clea Simon | Oct. 3, 2019 | harvard
~5 mins   

Tags: science-technology adi-ignatius danielle-allen edmond-j-safra-center-for-ethics engineering-technology harvard-business-review hubweek rana-el-kaliouby

Harvard scientists use optical tweezers to capture ultracold molecules

Using precisely focused lasers that act as “optical tweezers,” Harvard scientists have been able to capture and control individual ultracold molecules – the eventual building-blocks of a quantum computer – and study the collisions between them in more detail than ever before.

Peter Reuell | Oct. 2, 2019 | harvard
~6 mins   

Tags: science-technology center-for-ultracold-atoms doyle faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas harvard john-doyle kang-kuen-ni lasers molecular-tweezers molecules ni optical-tweezers peter-reuell quantum quantum-computer quantum-science-and-engineering-initiative reuell science tweezers ultracold-atoms ultracold-molecules

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