Less-wasteful laser-cutting

Fabricaide, developed at MIT CSAIL, provides live design feedback to help users reduce leftover material.

Adam Conner-Simons | MIT CSAIL • mit
Feb. 17, 2021 ~4 min

Better learning with shape-shifting objects

MIT study shows the power of adaptive training tools, like a basketball hoop that shrinks and raises as you make shots.

Adam Conner-Simons | MIT CSAIL • mit
Dec. 7, 2020 ~4 min

Electronic design tool morphs interactive objects

MorphSensor lets users digitally model an object’s form and electronic function in one integrated space.

Rachel Gordon | MIT CSAIL • mit
Oct. 22, 2020 ~5 min

Less scatterbrained scatterplots

Large datasets are difficult to depict as scatterplots — but that may change with a new CSAIL project for creating interactive visualizations.

Adam Conner-Simons | MIT CSAIL • mit
Oct. 7, 2020 ~3 min

Algorithm finds hidden connections between paintings at the Met

A team from MIT helped create an image retrieval system to find the closest matches of paintings from different artists and cultures.

Rachel Gordon | MIT CSAIL • mit
July 29, 2020 ~8 min

Sensors woven into a shirt can monitor vital signs

Comfortable, form-fitting garments could be used to remotely track patients’ health.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
April 23, 2020 ~5 min

Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes

In place of flat “breadboards,” 3D-printed CurveBoards enable easier testing of circuit design on electronics products.

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office • mit
March 3, 2020 ~8 min

“Sensorized” skin helps soft robots find their bearings

Flexible sensors and an artificial intelligence model tell deformable robots how their bodies are positioned in a 3D environment.

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office • mit
Feb. 12, 2020 ~7 min

Printing objects that can incorporate living organisms

A 3D printing system that controls the behavior of live bacteria could someday enable medical devices with therapeutic agents built in.

David L. Chandler | MIT News Office • mit
Jan. 23, 2020 ~7 min

Toward more efficient computing, with magnetic waves

Circuit design offers a path to “spintronic” devices that use little electricity and generate practically no heat.

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office • mit
Nov. 28, 2019 ~7 min

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