When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public's trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.

Stylianos Syropoulos, PhD Student in Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~6 min

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How to build trust in a COVID vaccine

A public campaign to build trust may be needed if a successful vaccine candidate is to be taken by enough Americans to interrupt the COVID pandemic, a Harvard public health expert said.

Alvin Powell • harvard
Sept. 16, 2020 ~6 min

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Retractions and controversies over coronavirus research show that the process of science is working as it should

Severe scrutiny of two major papers, including one about the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine, is part of science's normal process of self-correction.

Mark R. O'Brian, Professor and Chair of Biochemistry, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York • conversation
July 6, 2020 ~9 min

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