On environmental protection, Biden's election will mean a 180-degree turn from Trump policies

The Trump administration has used executive orders, deregulation and delays to reduce environmental regulation. Biden administration officials will use many of the same tools to undo their work.

Janet McCabe, Professor of Practice of Law, Indiana University • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~6 min

donald-trump air-pollution water-pollution environmental-justice joe-biden donald-trump-administration regulation us-environmental-protection-agency clean-air-act clean-water-act cost-benefit-analysis us-environmental-policy 2020-us-elections science-advice executive-orders

Delinquent electric bills from the pandemic are coming due – who will pay them?

Many Americans have been unable to pay their electric bills during the COVID-19 pandemic, racking up billions of dollars in delinquent bills. Where will the money come from?

Theodore J. Kury, Director of Energy Studies, University of Florida • conversation
Nov. 6, 2020 ~9 min

finance energy electricity regulation covid-19-pandemic consumers debt electric-utilities bonds consumer-protection debt-collection public-utility securities-markets

How tech firms have tried to stop disinformation and voter intimidation – and come up short

The major social media firms have taken a largely piecemeal and fractured approach to managing the problem.

Scott Shackelford, Associate Professor of Business Law and Ethics; Executive Director, Ostrom Workshop; Cybersecurity Program Chair, IU-Bloomington, Indiana University • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~9 min

social-media twitter google facebook disinformation regulations elections 2020-us-elections political-ads us-presidential-election voter-intimidation

There is a revolving door between industry and regulators, but does that really make for a 'cosy relationship'?

People often leave industry watchdogs to work for the very companies they were previously regulating.

Eva Heims, Lecturer in Public Policy, University of York • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~6 min

regulation environment-agency regulators corporate-power

There's a 'revolving door' between industry and regulators, but its effects aren't as strong as you think

People often leave industry watchdogs to work for the very companies they were previously regulating.

Eva Heims, Lecturer in Public Policy, University of York • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~6 min

regulation environment-agency regulators corporate-power

PFAS 'forever chemicals' are widespread and threaten human health – here's a strategy for protecting the public

PFAS chemicals are toxic, widespread and persistent in the environment, and the federal government has been slow to regulate them. A scientist explains why evaluating them one by one isn't working.

Carol Kwiatkowski, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University • conversation
Oct. 9, 2020 ~9 min

cancer pollution water-pollution regulation us-environmental-protection-agency environmental-health pfas teflon pfoa dupont

Looser standards for showerheads could send a lot of water and money down the drain

The Trump administration is trying to roll back a regulation that requires showerheads to conserve water and saves owners an average of $70 and nearly 3,000 gallons of water yearly per showerhead.

Robert Glennon, Regents Professor and Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy, University of Arizona • conversation
Sept. 2, 2020 ~8 min

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Cyberspace is critical infrastructure – it will take effective government oversight to make it safe

Self-regulation by the technology industry has failed to keep people safe online. That's a job for government.

Francine Berman, Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute • conversation
Aug. 10, 2020 ~8 min

covid-19 coronavirus internet pandemic online data-protection regulation privacy online-privacy legislation data-protection-regulation cyberspace kirsten-gillibrand privacy-online data-protection-online

Routine gas flaring is wasteful, polluting and undermeasured

Flaring, or burning, waste gas from energy production has sharply increased over the past decade. It wastes usable fuel, pollutes the air, and helps drive climate change.

Gunnar W. Schade, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University • conversation
July 29, 2020 ~9 min

air-pollution regulation oil us-energy-policy environmental-health natural-gas shale-gas nitrogen-oxide us-shale-oil

More people eat frog legs than you think – and humans are harvesting frogs at unsustainable rates

Frogs are harvested as food by the millions every year. A new study shows that uncontrolled frog hunting could drive some populations to extinction by midcentury.

Kerim Çiçek, Associate Professor of Zoology, Ege University • conversation
June 12, 2020 ~8 min

food extinction frogs regulation endangered-species amphibians hunting turkey

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