Americans don't eat enough fish and miss out on robust health benefits

The oils in fish are excellent buffers against disease. Why don't we eat more fish?

Michael Tlusty, Associate Professor of Sustainability and Food Solutions, University of Massachusetts Boston • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~5 min

food fish dietary-guidelines seafood shellfish nutrition salmon fish-oil sustainable-seafood

Giant 'toothed' birds flew over Antarctica 40 million to 50 million years ago

Paleontologists have discovered fossil remains belonging to an enormous 'toothed' bird that lived for a period of about 60 million years after dinosaurs.

Peter A. Kloess, Doctoral Candidate, Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Oct. 27, 2020 ~7 min

 birds  asteroid  dinosaurs  extinction  fish  fossils  reptiles  jaws  specimens  ice-age  antarctica  ice  new-zealand  ducks  earth  snow  museums  penguins  squid  marsupials  skeleton  southern-ocean  continents  cretaceous-period  natural-history  1980s  pterosaurs  vultures  southern-hemisphere  albatross  university-of-california-berkeley

When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the fishing infrastructure of Aransas Bay and reduced fishing by 80% over the following year. This removed humans from the trophic cascade and whole food webs changed.

Joseph W. Reustle, SPIRE Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~6 min

environment fish ecology hurricane fishing food-webs research-brief marine-biology ecosystems texas cyclones gulf-coast trophic-cascade oyster-reefs

Culverts – the major threat to fish you've probably never heard of

Fish need to cross roads too. But the tunnels built to channel rivers under roads and railways can block their migrations.

Sayali Pawar, Research Fellow in GIS and Environmental Change, Swansea University • conversation
Aug. 6, 2020 ~6 min

biodiversity fish construction dams rivers freshwater-biology roads eels

Healthier food can contain more contaminants – but there's a simple way to stay safe

A new study shows high-fibre brown rice also contains more arsenic than white rice – so which is better for you?

Ruth Fairchild, Senior Lecturer in Nutrition, Cardiff Metropolitan University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~7 min

fish pesticides nutrition mercury rice vegetables food-science methylmercury arsenic organic-food

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