Achieving COVID-19 herd immunity through infection is dangerous, deadly and might not even work

Some have suggested the US allow healthy people to return to normal life, catch the coronavirus and get the population to herd immunity. The science says this plan is doomed to fail from the start.

Steven Albert, Professor and Chair of Behavioral and Community Health, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
Oct. 28, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus donald-trump vaccines antibodies sars-cov-2 immunity herd-immunity viruses sweden antibody-testing death-rate case-fatality-rate

COVID-19 causes some patients' immune systems to attack their own bodies, which may contribute to severe illness

Are antibodies that attack a patient's own organs contributing to severe forms of COVID-19? A new study suggests specific antibody tests that may reveal the answer.

Matthew Woodruff, Instructor, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: covid-19 immune-system pandemic antibodies sars-cov-2 viruses autoimmune-diseases autoimmune-illness

A second pathway into cells for SARS-CoV-2: New understanding of the neuropilin-1 protein could speed vaccine research

Scientists in the UK and Germany discovered a new doorway that the COVID-19 virus uses to infect human cells. This reveals new therapeutic possibilities for blocking the virus.

Aubin Moutal, Research Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, University of Arizona • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: covid-19 pandemic pain sars-cov-2 pain-relief viruses infection chronic-pain

An autoimmune-like antibody response is linked with severe COVID-19

Patients suffering from severe COVID-19 may be experiencing a rogue antibody response similar to that seen in autoimmune diseases. The findings offer new approaches for COVID-19 therapy.

Matthew Woodruff, Instructor, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University • conversation
Oct. 8, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  covid-19  immune-system  pandemic  sars-cov-2  viruses  infection  cytokine-storm  antibody  autoimmune-diseases  b-cell

When COVID-19 superspreaders are talking, where you sit in the room matters

Experiments in college classrooms show how tiny respiratory droplets known as aerosols can spread, even with good ventilation. The risk isn't the same in every seat.

Suresh Dhaniyala, Bayard D. Clarkson Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, Clarkson University • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: health covid-19 coronavirus pandemic classrooms viruses buildings aerosols students universities college children-and-coronavirus

Catching COVID-19: Why where you sit in a classroom matters, and how ventilation can help

Experiments in college classrooms show how tiny respiratory droplets known as aerosols can spread, even with good ventilation. The risk isn't the same in every seat.

Suresh Dhaniyala, Bayard D. Clarkson Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, Clarkson University • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: health covid-19 coronavirus pandemic classrooms viruses buildings aerosols students universities college

How a pregnant mouse's microbes influence offspring's brain development – new study offers clues

Microbes in the gut aren't just important for digesting your food. In pregnant women, these gut microbes are producing chemicals that are essential for proper brain development of the fetus.

Helen Vuong, Postdoctoral Scholar of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles • conversation
Sept. 23, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: health medicine biology microbiome microbes viruses pregancy virome vaginal-microbiome

SARS-CoV-2 infection can block pain, opening up unexpected new possibilities for research into pain relief medication

The SARS-CoV-2 virus usually infects the body via the ACE2 protein. But there is another entry point that allows the virus to infect the nervous system and block pain perception.

Rajesh Khanna, Professor of Anesthesiology, University of Arizona • conversation
Sept. 21, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  covid-19  pandemic  pain  sars-cov-2  viruses  covid-19-pandemic  ace2  asymptomatic  chronic-pain  spike-protein

Coronavirus is hundreds of times more deadly for people over 60 than people under 40

Using random testing, researchers in Indiana were able to calculate death rates by age, race, and sex and found sharp increases in risk of death among older and non-white state residents.

Nir Menachemi, Professor of Health Policy and Management, IUPUI • conversation
Sept. 10, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: heart-disease health diabetes covid-19 coronavirus risk sars-cov-2 viruses indiana health-risks death-rate risk-of-death

More dengue fever and less malaria – mosquito control strategies may need to shift as Africa heats up

A warming climate may change the types of viruses that thrive. A new report suggests that the threat of malaria may be replaced by dengue, for which there is no treatment and no cure.

Jason Rasgon, Professor of Entomology and Disease Epidemiology, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
Sept. 9, 2020 ~5 min

Tags:  health  medicine  global-health  malaria  viruses  mosquitoes  sub-saharan-africa  dengue  aedes-aegypti  genetically-modified-mosquitoes

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